Archive for the ‘Youth & Families’ Category

SERF College Fair 3/17/18

Monday, March 12th, 2018

In addition to hosting reps from various colleges, SERF has invited a number of interesting speakers who will address topics ranging from “Conquering the College Essay” to “Navigating the College Search Process for Students with Learning Differences.” Worth checking out.

Information Session 2/8/18

Tuesday, January 9th, 2018
 
Please Join Us
to learn more about our Spring 2018 
Children, Youth & Families
Capacity Building Grant Program
 
Thursday, February 8, 2018
9:30 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.
326 Concord Road
Sudbury, MA 01776
Kindly RSVP by February 5
 

Posted on January 9, 2018

2017 Grant Awards

Wednesday, December 20th, 2017

 

We are pleased to support the good work of more than 40 local nonprofits who received our funding in 2017. They are not waiting a single moment to improve the world. Their efforts make life better for us all.

Sudbury Program Grants

Advocates, Inc., Framingham, MA, $20,300
To pilot a jail diversion program partnership in the towns of Sudbury and Hudson.

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School, Sudbury, MA, $7,500
Faculty stipends to pilot the Hub for Innovation, an innovative learning model for students and staff.

MetroWest Free Medical Program, Sudbury, MA, $1,200
To purchase equipment to create an additional exam room at the agency’s Sudbury location.

Organization for the Assabet, Sudbury & Concord Rivers, Concord, MA, $5,000
To create a report card on the health status of the Assabet, Sudbury and Concord rivers.

Sudbury United Methodist Church, Sudbury, MA, $25,000
In support of a capital campaign.

SWEET, Inc., Sudbury, MA, $545
A series of projects to help eradicate invasive species in Sudbury.

Town of Sudbury/Goodnow Library, Sudbury, MA, $31,250
To purchase equipment and provide staff training as part of an extensive renovation to the Library’s second floor.

Town of Sudbury/Health Department, Sudbury, MA, $1,650
To pilot the Budget Buddies financial literacy training.

Town of Sudbury/Health Department, Sudbury, MA, $17,000
To support a Hazardous Waste Collection Day.

Town of Sudbury/Council on Aging, Sudbury, MA, $15,000
To conduct a needs assessment of Sudbury’s Senior population.

Children, Youth & Families Program Grants

ACCEPT Education Collaborative, Natick, MA, $19,200
For a marketing/communications consultation.

Bethany Hill Place, Framingham, MA, $5,000
For a strategic planning consultation.

Birthday Wishes, Newton, MA, $5,000
For a fund development consultation.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central MA/MetroWest, Worcester, MA, $25,000
For a branding consultation.

Doc Wayne Youth Services, Boston, MA, $25,000
For a program evaluation consultation.

Family Promise Metrowest, Natick, MA, $10,000
For a strategic planning consultation.

Hoops and Homework, Framingham, MA, $16,500
For board development and strategic planning consultations.

Jeff’s Place, Framingham, MA, $20,500
For a board development consultation.

Jewish Family Service of Metrowest, Framingham, MA, $8,500
For a board development consultation.

MetroWest College Planning Center, Framingham, MA, $22,000
For business planning consultation.

Middlesex Partnerships for Youth, Wakefield, MA, $5,000
For a strategic planning consultation.

One Can Help, Newton, MA, $4,250
For a fund development consultation.

OUT MetroWest, Framingham, MA, $18,500
For a strategic planning consultation.

Partnerships for a Skilled Workforce, Marlborough, MA, $25,000
For a fund development consultation.

REACH Beyond Domestic Violence, Waltham, MA, $7,470
For board and staff social justice training.

SPARK Kindness, Natick, MA, $24,000
For a fund development consultation.

Taly Foundation, Framingham, MA, $20,000
For a brand and marketing consultation.

The Discovery Museums, Acton, MA, $4,000
For staff training.

Thrive Support and Advocacy, Marlborough, MA, $10,950
For a strategic planning consultation.

Wildflower, Inc., Lexington, MA, $10,950
For fund development support.

Wayside Youth & Family Support Network, Framingham, MA, $9,665
For staff development.

CY&F Invitation & Discretionary Grants:
Boys and Girls Clubs of MetroWest, Marlborough, MA, $100,000
For general support.

John Andrew Mazie Memorial Foundation, Worcester, MA, $25,000
For general support.

Framingham Police Department, Framingham, MA. $25,000
To support a community-wide opioid prevention initiative.

Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program, Lincoln, MA, $18,200
To strategize and pilot a new way of managing herd transition.

MetroWest Legal Services, Framingham, MA, $25,000
To provide legal representation to undocumented immigrant youth in Framingham.

Farm & Local Food Initiative Grants

Community Involved in Sustaining Agriculture, S. Deerfield, MA, $25,000
For general support.

Conservation Law Foundation, Boston, MA, $100,000 over three years
General support for the work of the Legal Food Hub in Massachusetts.

Franklin County CDC/Fiscal Agent for MA Food System Collaborative, Greenfield, MA, $25,000
General support for the Collaborative to implement the MA Local Food Action Plan.

Gaining Ground, Concord, MA, $25,000
To complete the transition to a no-till farm.

Mass. Department of Transitional Assistance, Boston, MA, $25,000
To support a state level evaluation of the Healthy Incentives Project, which provides SNAP households with greater access to fresh, healthy food.

Mill City Grows, Lowell, MA, $25,000
For general support.

Third Sector N.E./Fiscal Agent for New Entry Sustainable Farming Project, Lowell, MA, $25,000
For general support.

Third Sector N.E./Fiscal Agent for The Carrot Project, Boston, MA, $100,000 over three years
For general support.

Posted on December 20, 2017

Surviving & Thriving in Difficult Times 10/5/17

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017

Recent political shifts in Washington have many wondering what the future of government funding of health and social services may look like in the months ahead.

As funders and organizations concerned about the long-term health of the region and its residents, we believe it is important that local health and social service providers begin to plan for the potential impact that these changes may have on your organization and the people you serve. To this end, we have come together with other MetroWest Area funders to jointly sponsor a special one-day seminar entitled, SURVIVING AND THRIVING IN DIFFICULT TIMES.

The purpose of this seminar is to bring agencies together to hear how those in business and industry plan for these kinds of public policy and funding shifts. This seminar will be led by Dr. Michael Cummings, Senior Lecturer in Management at Babson College. Dr. Cummings has experience across several industries including manufacturing and healthcare. His research interests are in public policy and organizational performance and survival.

The workshop is limited to 40 participants and will be held on Thursday, October 5th from 8:30am-3:30pm at the Babson Executive Conference Center.

If you would like to attend, please RSVP online. If you have questions about this seminar, please contact Rebecca Gallo.

Thanks to the MetroWest Health Foundation, Middlesex Savings Bank Charitable Foundation, Foundation for MetroWest and MetroWest Nonprofit Network for joining us in bringing this workshop to MetroWest nonprofits.

Posted on September 19, 2017.

 

 

New Grant Awards

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Children, Youth and Families (CY&F) Program Grants

ACCEPT Education Collaborative, Natick, MA, $19,200
For a marketing/communications consultation.

Bethany Hill Place, Framingham, MA, $5,000
For a strategic planning consultation.

Doc Wayne Youth Services, Boston, MA, $25,000
For a program evaluation consultation.

Family Promise Metrowest, Natick, MA, $10,000
For a strategic planning consultation.

Hoops and Homework, Framingham, MA, $16,500
For board develop and strategic planning consultations.

Jeff’s Place, Framingham, MA, $20,500
For a board development consultation.

Jewish Family Service of Metrowest, Framingham, MA, $8,500
For a board development consultation.

Wayside Youth & Family Support Network, Framingham, MA, $9,665
For staff development.

CY&F Invitation & Discretionary Grants:
Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program, Lincoln, MA, $18,200
To strategize and pilot a new way of managing herd transition.

MetroWest Legal Services, Framingham, MA, $25,000
To provide legal representation to 30-40 undocumented immigrant youth in Framingham schools to assist them in applying for and obtaining legal status and to conduct “Know Your Rights” presentations and trainings.

Sudbury Program

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School, Sudbury, MA, $7,500
Faculty stipends to pilot the Hub for Innovation.

Town of Sudbury/Goodnow Library, Sudbury, MA, $31,250
To purchase equipment and provide staff training as part of an extensive renovation to the Library’s second floor.

MetroWest Free Medical Program, Sudbury, MA, $1,200
To purchase equipment to create an additional exam room at the Sudbury location.

Organization for the Assabet, Sudbury & Concord Rivers, Concord, MA, $5,000
To create a report card on the health status of the Assabet, Sudbury and Concord rivers.

Sudbury United Methodist Church, Sudbury, MA, $25,000
In support of a capital campaign.

SWEET, Inc., Sudbury, MA, $545
A series of small projects to help eradicate invasive species in Sudbury.

Sudbury Historical Society, Sudbury, MA, $200,000 matching grant
Toward a capital campaign to renovate the Loring Parsonage to create a Town History Center. 

Farm & Local Food Initiative

Mass. Dept. of Transitional Assistance Healthy Incentives Program (HIP), $25,000
To support a state-level evaluation of the HIP project which enables SNAP participants to use their benefits at farmers markets, farms stands, mobile markets and CSAs.

Franklin County CDC/Fiscal Agent for the  Mass. Food System Collaborative, Greenfield, MA, $25,000
General support for the Collaborative’s work supporting the recommendations of the Mass. Local Food Action Plan.

Conservation Law Foundation/Legal Food Hub, Boston, MA, $100,000 over three years
General support for the Massachusetts work of the Legal Food Hub which provides pro bono legal assistance to farmers and food purveyors.

Community Program

Massachusetts Business Alliance for Education, Boston, MA, $10,000
Honorariam recognizing former trustee Sharon Driscolls’s many years of service to the Foundation.

Posted on June 15, 2017

Working with Consultants

Wednesday, December 21st, 2016

Brain power

Most of our capacity building grants involve working with a consultant. There’s considerable value from such collaborations including gaining a fresh perspective or specific expertise. It can be especially helpful when previous efforts have stalled or stakeholders have wildly differing points of view.

But there are an equal number of headaches as well — from the resistance of staff or board members who shun interference from outsiders to the considerable added time it takes to bring the consultant up to speed about your organization.

Is it worth it?

Yes… IF you’ve thought it through, planned ahead, allotted enough time, gotten all your stakeholders on board and, most importantly, found the consultant who “gets” your organization and has the temperament to shepherd the project and your agency’s varied personalities through the process.

That’s a lot of “ifs”  – it does make your head spin — but it’s also a realistic view of what you should be thinking about before you jump in and hire a consultant.

One thing is for sure, the consultant doesn’t do all the work. In fact, most times you and your colleagues are the ones doing the deep thinking and heavy lifting. The truth is you’re the ones with the answers. You just don’t know it yet. Consultants facilitate the process and keep you moving forward. They steer you in the right direction and make sure no one is left behind. They help you get to the heart of what you need to do and to recognize how you’re going to get there.

When the stars align, the results of working with a consultant can be quite remarkable.

There’s much more to think and read about here:

Posted on December 21, 2016

2016 Winter Grant Awards

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

images-1The following organizations received support during our September and December grant cycles. We are delighted to have them as grant partners.

Sudbury Grants

Gaining Ground, Concord, MA, $5,000
To support Gaining Ground’s work providing healthy produce to the Sudbury Community Food Pantry, and other local pantries.

Sudbury Valley Trustees, Sudbury, MA, $10,000
To develop a master landscape plan for Wolbach Farm, the agency’s headquarters.

Town of Sudbury – Council on Aging, Sudbury, MA, $18,000
To encourage residents to support their neighbors through continued funding of the Senior Volunteer Coordinator position at the Fairbank Senior Center.

Children Youth & Families (CY&F) Grants

Communities for Restorative Justice, Concord MA, $22,500
For a marketing consultation.

Employment Options, Marlborough, MA, $15,000
For a consultation to develop a computer training program for young adult clients.

Massachusetts Audubon Society/Drumlin Farm, Lincoln, MA, $19,975
A evaluation consultation to develop assessment instruments for three programs and to train staff in program evaluation best practices.

One Can Help, Newton, MA, $5,870
To work with a social media consultant for one year to develop and implement a social media communications plan.

Taly Foundation, Framingham, MA, $13,100
For a strategic planning consultation.

Wildflower Camp Foundation, Wellesley, MA, $25,000
For communications, rebranding and website consultations.

CY&F Invitation Grants

John Andrew Mazie Memorial Foundation, Framingham, MA, $20,000
General support during a time of transition.

Boys & Girls Clubs of MetroWest, Marlborough, MA, $100,000
A combination grant to support professional development and other projects.

Farm & Local Food Initiative Grants

Boston Area Gleaners, Waltham, MA, $25,000
To work with a consultant to create a customized inventory management system to expand the agency’s ability to glean and distribute local produce to food banks and food pantries.

The Carrot Project, Boston, MA, $25,000
To work with a senior fellow for one year on client coordination, tracking and evaluation.

See our 2016 spring recipients here.

Posted on December 20, 2016

Poverty Beyond City Limits

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

poverty-clip-art-071510-vector-clip-art-free-clipart-images-UlGIVg-clipart copyMetroWest Funders and others: Please join us for a follow up conversation with Steve Pratt from Impact Catalysts (formerly with Root Cause) on poverty in the suburbs.

While still invisible to many, poverty in suburban communities is on the rise, including our communities in MetroWest.

Steve will share findings from his most recent work based in the Greater Washington DC area.  He will compare this geography with MetroWest’s, highlight some key catalysts for change and discuss potential action steps we as funders and donors can take to reduce poverty in our local communities.

Presenter: Steve Pratt, Impact Catalysts
Date: January 11, 2017
Time: Noon to 2:00 pm
Location: The Sudbury Foundation/Grange Hall, 326 Concord Road, Sudbury, MA
Sponsor: Associated Grant Makers

To register, click here.

Posted November 30, 2016

 

Off to College: A Momentous Change for Mom & Dad

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

beckhamBeverly Beckham’s wonderful 2006 Boston Globe essay on sending a child off to college remains true and heartfelt today. The Globe reprints it around this time every year. If you’re a parent who has just dropped your Freshman off at school, pull out your hankie. It’s worth reading: http://bit.ly/2bsy8St

Posted on August 23, 2016

Brainstorming: Thinking about Kids

Monday, July 25th, 2016

Brainstorming

Early Learners

How investing in Preschool Beats the Stock Market, Hands Down. Nobel laureate James Heckman, a professor of economics at the University of Chicago and the director of the Center for the Economics of Human Development, makes a strong argument to support early education programs in his paper, The Life-Cycle Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program.

11 Parenting Podcasts Worth Checking Out. Parenting: It’s the most important job of all and there’s no roadmap for how to do it best. Some good resources provided in this Washington Post article.

Read Aloud 15 Minutes. In an era of high-stakes testing and education reforms and revolutions, research has repeatedly proved that one simple parenting technique is among the most effective. Children who are read aloud to by parents get a head start in language and literacy skills and go to school better prepared.

The Joyful, Illiterate Kindergartners of Finland.  While American youngsters learn how to read, Kindergarten students in Finland play. Notes one researcher: “There isn’t any solid evidence that shows that children who are taught to read in kindergarten have any long-term benefit from it.” Food for thought.

Run-down schools trigger low test scores. Common sense says it’s so. (We’ve been saying it for years.) Now Cornell social scientists show why it’s true.

Teens & Young Adults

The Value of Mentoring. Whether formal or informal — mentoring is a powerful tool to keep young people on the right track, particularly kids who are disconnected from their community

Today’s College Students May Be Emotionally Unprepared. Findings confirm what we all know is happening. A survey of more than 123,000 students at 153 colleges by the American College Health Association in 2013 found that more than half experienced overwhelming anxiety and about a third felt deep depression during the academic year, as reported in the New York Times. Here’s one program that’s helping high school teens cope: Students returning to school after a serious mental health issue get the care they need thru “BRYT

The Real Reason College Tuition Costs So Much. Interesting findings reported in the New York Times. It’s not due to cuts in public funding but an increase in enrollment and administrative personnel.

The Cost of An Overdose. Facing the opiod-heroin crisis in MetroWest. In 2015 emergency personnel statewide responded to 11,884 opioid-related incidents, up from 6,315 in 2013.

Posted on July 25, 2016